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Featured article from Access

A man searching for a job in the newspaper
A man searching for a job in the newspaper

Finding it hard to get work.

People with disabilities can find it hard to get work. People with disabilities are employed less than people without a disability. There are many reasons for this. A person’s disability may limit the jobs they can do. A disability might make it hard for a person to go to school and learn the skills necessary for many jobs. Many people with disabilities need flexible working conditions that are not always available. Another reason is because employers may not hire people with disabilities. The unemployment rate for people with a disability is nearly twice that of those who do not have a disability.
1 comment - on 21/01/2015
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Featured article from Lifestyle

A man holding his hand to his ear to listen.
I am completely deaf in my right ear.

I am deaf in my right ear.

When I was young I was diagnosed with “profound unilateral hearing loss”, which sounds like something you get from thinking too deeply. In fact, it means I am completely deaf in my right ear. As a teenager there were some nights where being half-deaf felt like a superpower. In bed I could roll over onto my working ear and blot out noise completely. Another perk is a game I call “friend-shui”. When I go to dinner, I position my friends around my “good ear”. If I’d like to talk to somebody, I make sure that they sit next to me, while those who have annoyed me are shooed to the end of the table.
1 comment - on 16/01/2015

Featured article from Access

Two robots facing each other.
The robots can smile, and also blush.

The robots smile and can even blush.

Robots are already helping people with disabilities. In Melbourne people with autism and dementia are using robots in trials. La Trobe University’s Dr Rajiv Khosla is in charge of the trials. He has created the software for seven small robots that can sing, dance and play games. They read interactive stories and newspapers. They can issue reminders to take medications. The robots learn how their user is feeling and then respond appropriately. Dr Khosla envisages a future where many people with disabilities use robots.
2 comments - last comment on 12/01/2015

Featured article from Lifestyle

Maureen in a wheelchair with railway staff behind her.
I had to get into a manual wheelchair.

I had to use a manual wheelchair.

I have just returned from a wonderful holiday in Japan where I caused a stir riding my scooter. People everywhere were caring, respectful and willing to help. But it seemed that no one had seen such a mobility scooter before, including a staff member at the Emerging Science and Innovation Museum. The railway system was very accessible but I was not allowed to ride my scooter to or onto the train. It was not an electric wheelchair and there were rules. Our guide told us that people with mobility difficulties stay at home. A local disability advocate asked me to return to Japan to give a talk on getting out with my scooter. I think I will.
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Featured article from Lifestyle

Ceramic figurines depicting the nativity scene.
Nativity scenes and songs date back to the Middle Ages.

Nativity scenes and songs date back to the Middle Ages.

It’s that time of the year when the sounds of Christmas are everywhere. Hearing my favourite carol makes me think about the tradition of singing carols at Christmas. Carols have a long history dating back to the middle ages. Nativity scenes, plays and Christmas songs were developed in the 13th century. In 1647 Christmas songs were banned in England because they were seen as being inappropriate. Many of the Christmas festivities we know today were re- adopted in England in the 19th century.
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